Fujitsu takes Nuvoton ReRAM to 12Mbit

Fujitsu takes Nuvoton ReRAM to 12Mbit

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Fujitsu Semiconductor Memory Solution Ltd. has launched a 12Mbit ReRAM (Resistive Random Access Memory), MB85AS12MT, which is the largest density in Fujitsu’s ReRAM product family. The ReRAM technology is based on pulsed voltage programming of a metal oxide sandwiched between cross-point electrodes. This was developed jointly with Nuvoton Technology Corp.
By Peter Clarke

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Fujitsu Semiconductor Memory Solution Ltd. has launched a 12Mbit ReRAM (Resistive Random Access Memory), MB85AS12MT, which is the largest density in Fujitsu’s ReRAM product family.

The ReRAM technology is based on pulsed voltage programming of a metal oxide sandwiched between cross-point electrodes. This was developed jointly with Nuvoton Technology Corp. Japan – formerly Panasonic Semiconductor Solutions Co. Ltd. Fujitsu has been introducing the ReRAM as a complementary nonvolatile memory to its ferroelectric RAM (FRAM).

The 12Mbit product comes in a package measuring 2mm by 3mm and with a read current of 0.15mA on average during read operations. This makes the product suitable for use in wearable devices such as hearing aids and smart watches.

Specifications

The MB85AS12MT operates across a power supply voltage from 1.6V to 3.6V.

The Wafer Level Chip Scale package (WL-CSP) used for the MB85AS12MT can save approximately 80 percent of its mounted surface area compared with 8-pin SOP that is frequently used for memory devices with the Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI).

At an operating frequency of 5MHz, the average read current is 0.15mA and 1.0mA at 10MHz operation.

Evaluation samples are currently available.

Fujitsu continues to develop larger-density FRAM products for customers’ devices requiring frequent data rewriting.

Related links and articles:

www.fujitsu.com

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