Air flow sensor for ventilators from Sensirion

April 14, 2020 //By Peter Clarke
Air flow sensor for ventilators from Sensirion
Sensirion has introduced the SFM3019 air/oxygen flow sensor optimized for respiratory applications and states it is available in high volumes.

The Covid-19 pandemic has created a spike in demand for ventilators and consequently for the sensors that go into them. Sensirion AG (Stafa, Switzerland) has put a dedicated team of developers on to a project to bring an air/oxygen flow sensor to market offering easy integration into ventilators.

The SFM3019 is available in digital and analogue versions and has been based on existing sub-components that have been tried and tested.

The unit measures air and oxygen at rates from -10 standard litres per minute (slm) to 240slm. It outputs a 16bit resolution signal at a 2kHz update rate. The signal is internally linearized and temperature compensated.

The SFM3019 operates from a 3.3V to 5 Vdc supply voltage and features a digital two-wire interface, for connection to a microcontroller.

The sensor is made using Sensirion's CMOSens technology, which integrates the sensor element, signal processing and digital calibration within a single component. The gas is measured by a thermal sensor element to provide an extended dynamic range and enhanced long-term stability compared to other flow measuring technologies.

"Promoting health has always been a big driving force at Sensirion. This is why we not only aim to maintain the production of existing sensors for respiratory devices under observation of the highest safety and hygiene measures, but also to realize innovations at the same time so that we can provide even more sensor technology for life-saving respirators," said Marc von Waldkirch, CEO of Sensirion, in a statement.

The company said units are priced at less than €70, with the exact price depending on quantity and delivery conditions.

Related links and articles:

www.sensirion.com

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