Canada invests in photonic quantum computation startup

January 30, 2020 //By Peter Clarke
Canada invests in photonic quantum computation startup
The Sustainable Development Technology Canada (SDTC) foundation, created and funded by the Canadian government, has invested Canadian $4.4 million (about US$3.3 million) in Xanadu Quantum Technologies Inc. (Toronto,Canada).

This brings the total invested in the 2016 startup to CA$45.4 million (about US$34.4 million). SDTC's investment will be used to make Xandu's photonic quantum computation available over the cloud.

Xanadu was formed to exploit quantum effects in light and form photonic ICs to perform quantum computations. By operating with light Xanadu expects to avoid the low temperature requirements of electronic quantum computation.

Laser light is used to carry information through Xanadu's optical chips and it is expected that this approach will allow quantum calculation at room temperature, eliminating cooling systems required by most other types of quantum computers.

The STDC is funding a project to be carried out with University of Toronto and transportation company SwiftRide. The overall goal is to demonstrate the practical benefits of quantum computing for users and customers by the end of 2022.

Xanadu is following a similar strategy to PsiQuantum Corp. (Palo Alto, Calif.) in that it is pursuing photonic quantum computing.

"The quantum hardware technology that Xanadu is building will develop quantum computers with the ability to solve extremely challenging computational problems, completing chemical calculations in minutes — which would otherwise require a million CPUs in a data center," said Leah Lawrence, CEO of Sustainable Development Technology Canada, in a statement issued by Xanadu

Related links and articles:

www.xanadu.ai

www.sdtc.ca

News articles:

Quantum computing available via Amazon Web Services

Sheffield University opens quantum technology centre

Google's Sycamore quantum processor shows 'supremacy'

IBM provides Germany with quantum computer

Quantum computing near and disruptive, warns academic at Davos


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