Cardiff-based compound semiconductor accelerator appoints CEO

September 04, 2017 //By Peter Clarke
Cardiff-based compound semiconductor accelerator appoints CEO
The government backed Compound Semiconductor Applications Catapult, based in Cardiff, Wales, has appointed Stephen Doran as its CEO.

The CSA Catapult, set up in 2017 is intended to provide research facilities to accelerate the commercialisation of compound semiconductors in key application areas, particularly by startups and small and medium sized enterprises.

The Catapult brings together independent scientists, engineers, and industry experts at an industry leading research facility, to explore novel applications of UK designed compound semiconductor technology to programmes relating to power electronics, ohotonics, RF and microwave.

Doran comes with more than 25 years experience in the semiconductor industry, having served as Director of Operations and Transformation within Raytheon UK and prior to that as chief operating officer with Wolfson Microelectronics and prior to that worked with Motorola.

"The Catapult offers the UK its best opportunity to establish itself as the global leader in compound semiconductors (CS)," said Doran in a statement.

The accelerator said that the annual global compound semiconductor market is forecast to be worth £125 billion (about $160 billion) in 2025 with sales into all sectors including healthcare, the digital economy, energy, transport, defence and security, and space.

The CSA Catapult is part of nationwide network of technology innovation centres designed and created by UK government agency Innovate UK to drive economic growth. It forms part of attempts to create a cluster of compound semiconductor wealth creation in South Wales.

Related links and articles:

csa.catapult.org.uk

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