Chinese x86 firm set to benefit from domestic supply mandate

December 17, 2019 //By Peter Clarke
Chinese x86 firm set to benefit from domestic supply mandate
The Chinese government has decided that all state-owned computers will be based on domestic technology by the end of 2020, according to a Financial Times report that reference Chinese technology analysts.

That could be a boon for a Chinese state-owned fabless chip company called Shanghai Zhaoxin Semiconductor Co. Ltd. that makes x86 processors and is getting to grips with 7nm manufacturing process technology.

The Chinese mandate includes the development of a domestic set of enterprise operating systems and will open millions of processor slots to domestic companies to the detriment of Intel, AMD, Nvidia and others. The plan goes under the name 3-5-2 because it is sufficiently detailed to state that 30 percent of the transformation must be done by the end of 2020; the process must be 80 percent done by the end of 2021 and the final 20 percent completed by the end of 2022.

Zhaoxin is a state-owned fabless chip company established in 2013 headquartered in Zhangjiang, Shanghai.

Roadmap for Zhaoxin x86 CPUs.

Since its formation the company has been playing catch-up with western x86 designs and been behind the leading edge but in June of 2019 reportedly introduced a 16nm x86 design called KaiXian KX-6000. The KX-6000, operates at up to 3GHz clock frequency has between four and eight cores and features an integrated GPU on-chip.

The company has plans to introduce a 7nm KaiXian KX-7000 in the next couple of years that could see it overtake Intel and compete with AMD in terms of performance. The KX-7000 is expected to appear in 2021. It will be based on a new CPU architecture and have up to 32 cores and support 64 threads.

Related links and articles:

www.zhaoxin.com

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